3/17/2009

Curious Josh: It's Not Easy Being Green...

Curious about the other posts in this series? Check them out here...

Here's the deal: I have red hair and freckles. As a result of this affliction, I've been asked my entire life if I'm Irish. For the record, I have no idea what my ancestral background is. But I do know that I don't like wearing the color green. I feel like it either makes me look like a Christmas tree decoration or a leprechaun. Which is why St. Patrick's Day is always a thorn in my side. It's a holiday that makes me wear a color I don't look good in lest I suffer a pinch from others.

So I began to wonder, why do we wear green on St. Patrick's Day anyway? And, after some investigation, I was quite surprised by the answer...

St. Patrick's Blue, not green, was the colour long-associated with St. Patrick. Green, the colour most widely associated with Ireland, with Irish people, and with St. Patrick's Day in modern times, may have gained its prominence through the phrase "the wearing of the green" meaning to wear a shamrock on one's clothing. At many times in Irish history, to do so was seen as a sign of Irish nationalism or loyalty to the Roman Catholic faith. St. Patrick used the shamrock, a three-leaved plant, to explain the Holy Trinity to the pre-Christian Irish. The wearing of and display of shamrocks and shamrock-inspired designs have become a ubiquitous feature of the saint's holiday. The change to Ireland's association with green rather than blue probably began around the 1750's.

You can check out the whole wikipedia article here.

A way of teaching the trinity? Sweet...

And now you know...

1 comment:

Julie Hibbard said...

I have OFTEN heard the trinity explained with a shamrock. Lucky thing, huh?
I never ever thought of you as Irish. And I am sure you look great in green.
Thanks for the education! I heard he never drove snakes out of Ireland either! And what about a four leaf clover?
Oh pass me another green beer!!