4/14/2009

Who Said TV Couldn't Inspire...

I don't have any reason to post this picture of Burger Chihuahua, other than I love it.

Monday night is a crowded TV night for me. So many good shows, all at the same time. Since I can only watch one thing at a time, I plan my watching around what shows I know I'll be able to catch online over the next week. Last night, two shows that I watch sparked some thoughts...

Heroes Let's get this out the way now: Heroes is a shell of its former self. I'm not going to say that it's 100% terrible, as it occasionally hits a double, but it's been a long time since it's hit a home run. As I watched it last night, I thought, "Here's a show that everyone talked about in its first season because it was doing things that were unique. It was dubbed NBC's new 'biggest' hit and immediately given a prime timeslot. And now... Ugh." Pretty much everyone who I know who loves the show agrees that it hasn't been the same since the first season. But, supposedly, NBC has recognized this and has made some drastic course corrections (like firing the shows two head writers, Jesse Alexander and Jeph Loeb and re-hiring former writer and creator of Pushing Daisies, Bryan Fuller) to put things back on the right track. All of that to say, I was left with this question...

Does change (improvement) have to be motivated by a fall?

Ministry is always looking to change and find ways to reach people where they are. But does our motivation for change have to come from losing effectiveness?

I'm still thinking on this one. Feel free to share your ideas though...

How I Met Your Mother If you're not watching this show, then you need to be. I love it. It's made several appearances in my Power Rankings. Last night, one of its characters was worrying about something and demonstrating this worry by making a remark about libraries. To which another character remarked that nobody goes to libraries anymore, that they're obsolete. (Which I don't think I agree with, by the way.) But it made me wonder...

Are there things we're doing in ministry (even ones that were once positive and revolutionary) that have now become obsolete and need to be let go of?

I don't think healthy ministry is possible without consistent evaluation and change. Health comes from recognizing problems and addressing them. And, as anyone who's ever worked with a group of people for more than five minutes can attest to, problems will arise. This question can be specific to a certain ministry or it can be collective.

Now that's a lot of thinking that came from two shows. So after, I turned on Family Guy and vegged out. After all, I wouldn't want to think too much...

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